ForwardFocus Session Information

This year's conference is dedicated to The Changing Information Landscape: Libraries in the “Post-Truth” and Open Access Era. We have a great group of librarians excited to share how they are teaching information literacy, advocating for access, and leading students and faculty into the new information age. 

 
 
 Laura Burt-Nicholas

Laura Burt-Nicholas

 Beth Kirkpatrick

Beth Kirkpatrick

Fake Science: Training Students to Critically Read Research Articles

Presenter: Laura Burt-Nicholas and Beth Kirkpatrick

As librarians, often our teaching about credibility and source evaluation focuses on websites or the difference between popular and peer-reviewed research. As crises in scientific replicability have grown and as concerns about how research funding can impact results have similarly grown, it’s clear that teaching our students to properly evaluate research literature is vitally important.

Laura Burt-Nicholas and Beth Kirkpatrick, the science librarian and a biology professor from the College of DuPage, will present on an assignment that requires second semester biology students to compare and evaluate the credibility of two scientific research articles. They will talk about the assignment, the Information Literacy instruction, and its impact on the students understanding of both the scientific method and information literacy.

 
 Jeff Ellair

Jeff Ellair

Info Lit Instruction for the Developmental English Course: A Golden Opportunity

Presenter: Jeff Ellair

Even though the course doesn’t include any research assignments, the instruction librarian at UW-Sheboygan teaches an information literacy session each semester for the non-degree credit ENG 098: Introduction to College Writing. The entire 75-minute session is spent on student hands-on exercises and sharing of results, covering basic concepts of identification, comparison and evaluation of various source types. There is no instruction or work on databases or other discovery sources. In addition to the benefit to ENG 098 students, teaching this session has provided valuable librarian experiences and insight – even inspiration! – that have helped improve IL instruction for other courses. Jeff will explain the organization and outcomes of the session, he’ll share the exercises and results of the students’ work, and will tell why this has become his favorite class to teach.

 
 Kona Jones

Kona Jones

Breaking the "Fake News" Cycle

Presenter: Kona Jones

In this session Kona will provide different examples of assignments she has used with her statistics students to help them better understand what fake news is and how to avoid falling into the cycle of believing and spreading fake news. Additional information will include student reactions and feedback from these assignments.

 
Sanders pic.jpg

Cut the CRAP: Teaching credibility beyond the acronyms

Presenter: Colleen Sanders

Currency, reliability, authority and purpose are valuable lenses for teaching students to evaluate information. Yet, there is a growing sense that information evaluation requires an instructional toolkit robust enough to match its multifarious applications. What other approaches might belong in our pedagogy, and how can the value of the C.R.A.P. model be adapted to these approaches? How can we build active learning into information evaluation? How can we design assignments, activities, and instruction that serve diverse learners equitably across a range of instruction modalities? This session will explore these questions through the lens of a small but mighty community college in Oregon City, OR, where librarians and English faculty desired a new approach to information evaluation instruction.

 
 Christopher Younkin

Christopher Younkin

Fighting the Fake: Teaching Undergrads to be BRATS about Information Evaluation

Presenter: Christopher Younkin

Fake news continues to capture the interest and imagination of information professionals and the public alike. It presents library professionals and other educators with an opportunity to discuss a pressing need for practical information evaluation skills for everyday encounters with potentially deceptive news and other media. In the fall of 2017, a pair of library staff members at the Ohio State University Libraries developed the BRATS method for evaluating the trustworthiness of news and other information sources. Inspired by professional fact checking practice, this method gives users a simple set of questions and evaluation criteria to guide a closer examination of an information source and assess its trustworthiness. This presentation offers attendees details about and practice with the BRATS method, and insights gained from teaching the method to undergraduates in workshops offered throughout the 2017-18 school year.